Sending so much gratitude to Jordan for sharing their insights and resources with us last week. We had some great discussions about ancestors, grief, mycelium, and connections. Below are some notes and resources from our time together.  


jordan alexander williams (they/them) is a queer hoodoo, earth steward & future ancestor moving towards life & shaping change


Mycelium

  • “is the part of the fungus that grows underground in thread-like formations. It connects roots to one another and breaks down planet material to create healthier ecosystems. Mycelium is the largest organism on earth. Interconnectedness. Remediation. Detoxification.” 

Emergent Strategy, adrienne maree brown (p. 45)

Questions:

  • What is your relationship to death, decay &/or decomposition?
  • What rituals do you &/or your people practice to honor death? To honor your ancestors?
  • What role(s) does decomposition play in our relationships with each other? What possibilities does decomposition allow?
  • How do you view transitions in life, in nature?

Wholes

  • “Seeing wholes is important because it counteracts our mental tendency to fragment. It’s actually easy to do, but it is a little hard to describe. Start by seeing something as it presents itself in its entirety, independent of any analysis—not as a collection of parts or characteristics, not in terms of its relationships, but simply as itself. When we begin from the image of a simple entirety, whatever we are looking at presents itself to our minds as singular, as just what it is. Later we can examine it for the multiplicity of inner and outer aspects and connections that are also true of it.”

The Regenerative Life, Carol Sanford (p. 25)

Nested Wholes | Fractals

  • “Every system—whether an ecosystem, organization, institution, or society—is an orchestrated web of individuals, each playing their part in contributing to the whole. When we embark on systems change, we must consider both the details and the bigger picture. All living systems, including human systems, are fractals. Our cells make up organs, which in turn make up body systems, which collectively build an organism. The same organizing principles apply across scales of these fractal systems. We call this a Nested Wholes framework.” Regenerative Design for Change Makers, Abrah Dresdale (p. 24)
  • “All that you touch you change; all that you change, changes you.” Octavia Butler, Parable of the Sower
  • “Transform yourself to transform the world.” Grace Lee Boggs

Questions:

  • Where or how do nested wholes & fractals show up in the traditions of your people?
  • How can you reclaim or remember earth-sourced wisdom(s) of your lineages?
  • What has nature been teaching you this year?

Remember: you are already whole, just as you are—the remedy is you


More References & Resources: